link

๐Ÿ”ฅ Currency - Official Star Trek Online Wiki

Most Liked Casino Bonuses in the last 7 days ๐Ÿค‘

Filter:
Sort:
BN55TO644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

Nobody works for a living in the Star Trek Federation since the concept of money does not exist. Without money as a medium of exchange, how does the Federation conduct trade with the other worlds? I cannot imagine how the money-minded Ferengis would want to have any dealings with humans if no money is involved.


Enjoy!
United Federation of Planets - Wikipedia
Valid for casinos
Currency - Official Star Trek Online Wiki
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
How can the world function without money in Star Trek?
What is the motivation to work?
How can a currency free society work and what are we doing to get there?
Is there anyone working on replicator technology right now?
Some features may not work correctly.
How can the world function without star trek money doesnt exist in Star Trek?
What is the motivation to work?
How can a currency free society work and what star trek money doesnt exist we doing star trek money doesnt exist get there?
Is there anyone working on replicator star trek money doesnt exist star trek slot free now?
Scarcity At the moment, resources are scarce which means we have to allocate them somehow.
Society uses money to do that efficiently and we all end up on the merry-go-round: Post Scarcity Because of the unlimited energy and replication technology in Star Trek, effectively unlimited resources are available to all those who need them.
There is no poverty and no hunger.
There's no need to work to get money to buy things.
It's codes for google play music a big, ole box.
There is the question of persons of unlimited greed, who wish to collect 'everything' just to have more than the next guy.
What about inherently scarce goods?
Star Trek: we actually will always have Paris.
Why would anyone work to 'better the rest of humanity'?
Most people probably don't, and there's no need for them to do so - they can spend their lives on the holodeck having fun if they want.
What do you mean you don't do frozen Margaritas?
But there are always people who are driven to achieve.
Without money as the mechanism for measuring that achievement, their motivation becomes either personal satisfaction, society's plaudits, or status and reputation.
This is similar to the way university professors or artists operate today.
Why would anyone be a red shirt?
It's easy enough to see why the officers want their jobs, but why the low level transporter operators etc.?
Presumably, they hope to get promoted to the better jobs.
Possibly it's not the most realistic aspect of the show; humdrum jobs would be more likely to be handled by the ship's computers However, any group of people will include a small number of very adventurous people, the kinds of people who do extreme sports now.
Starfleet isn't that big and has the huge population base of the Federation to draw on.
Only a small percentage need to have the drive to join.

T7766547
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

Star Trek Online. All Discussions. You may want to spend a little money for a one month sub as this unlocks some nice extras for the whole account that stay.


Enjoy!
money - Why and how did the Star Trek Universe evolve to a cashless/commerce-less society? - Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange
Valid for casinos
Money | Memory Alpha | FANDOM powered by Wikia
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
Science

B6655644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

12 Star Trek Gadgets That Now Exist. BY John Brandon.. Star Trek. And the future, it turns out, is coming sooner than even Trek's writers could have imagined.. Doesnโ€™t seem possible,.


Enjoy!
Money | Memory Alpha | FANDOM powered by Wikia
Valid for casinos
How can the world function without money in Star Trek? What is the motivation to work? How can a currency free society work and what are we doing to get there? Is there anyone working on replicator technology right now? - Quora
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
You will have to before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.
As pointed out, the short answer is "it doesn't work at all", because the whole concept of a post-scarcity society doesn't really make sense.
You have advanced technology and a big food surplus?
But that doesn't make your economy 'post-scarcity' any more than ours is.
All the major resources โ€” energy, space, raw materials, labour, knowledge, time โ€” are still limited, so click here you want something you don't have, what are you going to do?
DS9 actually demonstrated this in an unintentionally hilarious way.
There's an episode where O'Brien needs some techno-widget to get the Defiant running on time.
He doesn't have one, but with Rom's help he finds out that some guy on another starship has his techno-widget.
To get his techno-widget he needs another thing to trade to the starship, and to get that thing he has to trade for another thing, and to get that thing he needs to trade for another thing, and at the end of a ludicrously complicated chain of deals and a vast amount of stress, he finally gets his widget.
This is called "barter", and it was invented sometime before recorded history.
The reason that it isn't the standard method of trade anymore is that humanity figured out several thousand years ago that life was a lot easier if instead of having to trade individually for everything you needed, you could just use commonly accepted medium of exchange.
The word we use for this medium of exchange is "money".
Which means that economically, the Federation is around three thousand years less advanced than we are.
Yes, but DS9 also provided the answer for how money works.
The accepted currency of most of the Federation is Latinum - a rare, non-replicable material that seems to have no other use which is the ideal material to use for currency.
The Federation simply refuses to USE an official currency - and honestly given Starfleet's reaction to anybody that asks how they get by, they refuse to use a currency because to actually adopt a currency would mean actually admitting that they aren't as awesome and wholesome and advanced as they like to tell people.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
Yes, but DS9 also provided the answer for how money works.
The accepted currency of most of the Federation is Latinum - a rare, non-replicable material that seems to have no other use which is the ideal material to use for currency.
The Federation simply refuses to USE an official currency - and honestly given Starfleet's reaction to anybody that asks how they get by, they refuse to use a currency because to actually adopt a currency would mean actually admitting that they aren't as awesome and wholesome and advanced as they like to tell people.
I thought latinum was only used as a currency outside of the Federation, since DS9 covers what's essentially a Bajoran station out on the frontier.
Within the Federation itself, there could be a currency system in place that the citizens themselves don't think of as "money" since it doesn't cover any of the material essentials that a Federation citizens needs and the Federation and its citizens only uses latinum for trade with other cultures.
As pointed out, the short answer is "it doesn't work at stars codes, because the whole concept of a post-scarcity society doesn't really make sense.
You have advanced technology and a big food surplus?
But that doesn't make your economy 'post-scarcity' any more than ours is.
All the major resources โ€” energy, space, raw materials, labour, knowledge, time โ€” are still limited, so if you want something you don't have, what are you going to do?
DS9 actually demonstrated this in an unintentionally hilarious way.
There's an episode where O'Brien needs some techno-widget to get the Defiant running on time.
He doesn't have one, but with Rom's help he finds out that some guy on another starship has his techno-widget.
To get his techno-widget he needs another thing to trade to the starship, and to get that thing he has to trade for another thing, and to get that thing he https://free-slots-money.website/star/money-star-atm.html to trade for another thing, and at the end of a ludicrously complicated chain of deals and a vast amount of stress, he finally gets his widget.
This is called "barter", and it was invented sometime before recorded history.
The reason that it isn't the standard method of trade anymore is that humanity figured out several thousand years ago that life was a lot easier if instead of having to trade individually for everything you needed, you could just use commonly accepted medium of exchange.
The word we use for this medium of exchange is "money".
Which means that economically, the Federation is around three thousand years less advanced than we are.
It seems like it's a failure of Starfleet Logistics, rather than the Federation economy, since every person along the way is a member of Starfleet and ideally should be solving these kinds of problems and there should be a system in place to solve this.
I don't think many modern day intra-organization logistics operate on a currency basis, but I could be wrong.
I thought latinum was only used as a currency outside of the Federation, since DS9 covers what's essentially a Bajoran station out on the frontier.
Within the Federation itself, there could be a currency system in place that the citizens themselves don't think of as "money" since it doesn't cover any of the material essentials that a Federation citizens needs and only uses latinum for trade with other cultures.
It seems like it's a failure of Starfleet Logistics, rather than the Federation economy, since every person along the way is a member of Starfleet and ideally should be solving these kinds of problems and there should be a system in place to solve this.
I don't think many modern day intra-organization logistics operate on a currency basis, but I could be wrong.
There was a lot more than that.
There was SOMETHING involving trading General Martok's cases of blood wine to somebody, and then getting a different vintage of blood wine back.
He also star trek money doesnt exist on a runabout for an undisclosed reason.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
The ironic thing I've always enjoyed is that, at the end of the day, Gene's view of a perfect human society is basically the Ferengi.
What his weird and awful ideas would create in reality would be them.
I really just don't get what you are talking about here.
As pointed out, the short answer is "it doesn't work at all", because the whole concept of a post-scarcity society doesn't really make sense.
You have advanced technology and a big food surplus?
But that doesn't make your economy 'post-scarcity' any more than ours is.
All the major resources โ€” energy, space, raw materials, labour, knowledge, time โ€” are still limited, so if you want something you don't have, what are you going to do?
As I mentioned contra this sort of view just above, the basic resources: food, clothing, shelter, basic materials, most tools, even education and recreation, are to be had in abundance, and I don't see why that cannot be the foundation for a society where the majority of people feels like they are rich and not obligated to vigorously compete for the few rare resources.
Apparently, you can get a small apartment in San Francisco but perhaps you need a job there first.
There are plenty of times and places that used other systems for regulating land.
I understand that energy is not unlimited, but there seems to be enough of it for most people's daily needs!
So too goes for raw materials.
The notion that labour saving devices somehow created a surplus of time may seem odd to 21st century people.
I don't understand why you think knowledge is particularly scarce.
Expert knowledge exists of course, but what exactly do people need that is hard to come by in this future?
Not medicine except for treatments of rare space diseasesnot food, etc etc.
The DS9 barter episode is more of a one-off light-hearted episode than a suggestion for how the economy of the future works.
Someone did mention logistics.
However, now you are getting well into fridge logic territory, well I wanted to point out there is a surface reasonableness to how humanity functions.
Is it truly that hard to envision a far future hyper-advanced society where people, by and large, are actually be more interested in what's truly fulfilling in life rather than accumulating stuff?
Must everything that remains scarce be commoditized and traded based on a single medium of exchange?
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar I really just don't get what you are talking about here.
To say that Gene Roddenbury, the creator of Star Trek, was a horrible pervert who didn't understand the implications of a lot of what he was writing.
I stand firm by my belief that his death was the best thing that happened to Star Trek, and this entire money problem we're discussing is basically rooted in it.
Sorry, I'll stop being all grognardy now I have heard enough about the creator god of Star Trek to know he had some pretty weird and wacked-out views.
I think talking about his beliefs, expressed views, prejudices and bigoted comments my own ill-educated view is those four are probably contradictory both with themselves and each other is its own potentially already having been banned thread.
Not only do I think such a society is imaginable, but that there isn't anything particularly special of imagining a society that is motivated by something other than greed.
Heck, most major characters across media are mainly directed by ideals or family or something other than money, and that's also true about many fictional societies whether money exists or not.
Maybe money has to exist or its existence is good for somethings the information science behind that being the most efficient form of satisfying demand is darn close to being true by sheer logicbut a society built on money on the other hand.
In envisioning such a society of the future.
Star Trek isn't obviously wrong and it's also hardly unique.
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar To say that Gene Roddenbury, the creator of Star Trek, was a horrible pervert who didn't understand the implications of a lot of what he was writing.
I stand firm by my belief that his death was the best thing that happened to Star Trek, and this entire money problem we're discussing is basically rooted in it.
Sorry, I'll stop being all grognardy now I'd agree that his notions about good television were poor; the fact that the crew couldn't argue among themselves and that humanity had to be cast in the best light was stifling for the show.
I remember Rick Berman saying he had a bust of Roddenberry and he'd blindfold his eyes whenever he broke one of Roddenberry's rules.
That said, the show at the very beginning was remarkably innovative and Roddenberry's check this out of a completely multi-ethnic, multi-national crew was pioneering at the time.
My eyes mist whenever I read anything by Nichelle Nichols, George Takei, or any of the numerous people whose lives were touched by Star Trek.
I'm sure Roddenberry would have disapproved of my favorite Trek, DS9.
There was a lot more than that.
There was SOMETHING involving trading General Martok's cases of blood wine to somebody, and then getting a different vintage of blood wine back.
He also disappeared on a runabout for an undisclosed reason.
My head canon has Nogg exploiting O'Brien's credentials to do all sorts of other profitable things in addition to getting the part that O'Brien needed ; I'd agree that his notions about good television were poor; the fact that the crew couldn't argue among themselves and humanity cast in the best light was stifling for the show.
I remember Rick Berman saying he had a bust of Roddenberry and he'd blindfold his eyes whenever he broke one of Roddenberry's rules.
That said, the show at the very beginning was remarkably innovative and Roddenberry's vision of a completely multi-ethnic, multi-national crew was pioneering at the time.
My eyes mist whenever I read anything by Nichelle Nichols, George Takei, or any of the numerous people whose lives were touched by Star Trek.
I'm sure Roddenberry would have disapproved of my favorite Trek, DS9.
My head canon has Nogg exploiting O'Brien's credentials to do all sorts of other profitable things in addition to getting the part link O'Brien needed ; The thing he created is far more outstanding then the man himself, and I guess that's the best legacy.
Because you're not wrong, on both how Star Trek was very innovative and inclusive on races.
Is it truly that hard to envision a far future hyper-advanced society where https://free-slots-money.website/star/all-star-slots-uk.html, by and large, are actually be more interested in what's truly fulfilling in life rather than accumulating stuff?
Must everything that remains scarce be commoditized and traded based on a single medium of exchange?
This is what's known as a false dichotomy.
Having a single medium of exchange doesn't make a society less advanced or less able to focus on what's fulfilling in life โ€” in fact, it's pretty much the opposite, since it gives you more freedom to spend your time as you wish.
Yes, theoretically, you can build a modern society without a medium of exchange, but no-one does it, because it's horribly inefficient.
I'm the author of the series of urban fantasy novels.
I have heard enough about the creator god of Star Trek to know he had some pretty weird and wacked-out views.
I think talking about his beliefs, expressed views, prejudices and bigoted comments my own ill-educated view is those four are probably contradictory both with themselves and each other is its own potentially already having been banned thread.
Not only do I think such a society is imaginable, but that there isn't anything particularly special of imagining a society that is motivated by something other than greed.
Heck, most major characters across media are mainly directed by ideals or family or something other than money, and that's also true about many fictional societies whether money exists or not.
Maybe money has to exist or its existence codes stars good for somethings the information science behind that being the most efficient form of satisfying demand is darn close to being true by sheer logicbut a society built on money on the other hand.
In envisioning such a society of the future.
Star Trek isn't obviously wrong and it's also hardly unique.
Star Trek is totally inconsistent as to whether the so-called post scarcity economy even EXISTS, much less whether it works.
The main problem is that there are a large number of things that simply cannot be created land, works of artmany more that simply cannot be created on a large enough scale to let everybody, or even most people, be able to have one starships, large housesmore extremely useful items that they explicitly cannot create dilithiumand even more that are less desirable when created from a replicator food and drinks.
Then, it features many instances of cast members across ALL the shows making explicit references to buying things and using Federation credits.
It features a large number of episodes with explicit poor people and extremely poor planets within the Federation.
It features a number of non-Starfleet Federation citizens working in extremely harsh or dangerous conditions that they would not possibly be doing because they enjoyed it mining in particular.
There are a large number of companies within the Federation that are explicitly motivated by profit.
The universe consistently tells many people that non-replicated food and beverages are still in very high demand and yet can't explain how these things are purchased without money.
There are many references made to trade deals but large scale trade is completely impossible without currency.
In short, the large body of evidence says that there IS money in the Federation and that anybody that said otherwise was just mouthing the party line.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
Copies of works of art are still works of art, they simply are not original works of art.
Artists in all art forms have been creating copies of originals for those who desire such for literally thousands of years.
Obtaining the original is relatively difficult - there's only one original of any given artwork, and, especially if the artist is famous or if works from the era in which the work you want originated are protected e.
Also, depending on how accurately you believe a replicator can recreate an object, it may well be possible codes for google play music create copies of works of art which are virtually indistinguishable from the original even to experts using laboratory-grade tools to compare the copy and the original side-by-side, if the pattern the replicator used for the work was sufficiently accurate.
It's still not technically the original, and it might well be illegal to make a copy which is virtually indistinguishable from the original even in the supposedly money-free Federation, but it may well be possible.
There are many references made to trade deals but large scale trade is completely impossible without currency.
That's not entirely true.
Only if you have nothing that your potential trading partner is sufficiently interested in obtaining to bother working with you to establish exchange rates whether by precedent or negotiation.
Of course, because it's more difficult and less convenient to work without a common medium of exchange, people engaged in such trade might end up with a de facto currency even if there is no official currency, or make use of a currency from another region.
It seems like it's a failure of Starfleet Logistics, rather than the Federation economy, since every person along the way is a member of Starfleet and ideally should be solving these kinds of problems and there should be a system in place to solve this.
I don't think many modern day intra-organization logistics operate on a currency basis, but I could be wrong.
Yeah I don't see how currency would necessarily have solved this.
If I need machine A to do a task but machine A is being used be a different team, I generally can't find a monetary solution to this, within the company aside buying a new machine and even that probably wouldn't work within time constraints.
I MAY be able to trade favors to get access to it though.
This is really no different than what was happening on this episode.
As pointed out, the short answer is "it doesn't work at all", because the whole concept of a post-scarcity society doesn't really make sense.
You have advanced technology and a big food surplus?
But that doesn't make your economy 'post-scarcity' any more than ours is.
All the major resources โ€” energy, space, raw materials, labour, knowledge, time โ€” are still limited, so if you want something you don't have, what are you going to do?
DS9 actually demonstrated this in an unintentionally hilarious way.
There's an episode where O'Brien needs some techno-widget to get the Defiant running on time.
He doesn't have one, but with Rom's help he finds out that some guy on another starship has his techno-widget.
To get his techno-widget he needs another thing to trade to the starship, and to get that thing he has to trade for another thing, and to get that thing he needs to trade for another thing, and at the end of a ludicrously complicated chain of deals and a vast amount of stress, he finally gets his widget.
This is called "barter", and it was invented sometime before recorded history.
The reason that it isn't the standard method of trade anymore is that humanity figured out several thousand years ago that life was a lot easier if instead of having to trade individually for everything you needed, you could just use commonly accepted medium of exchange.
The word we use for this medium of exchange is "money".
Which means that economically, the Federation is around three thousand years less advanced than we are.
Remember that the lack of a Technothingy wasnt S.
It was an exceptional situation brought upon them by a Galactic-scale war that drew every supplies short.
The Technothingy was not exactly critical material the gravity fluctuated a bit, but not in a threatening manner so OBrian and the Defiant were simply put at the bottom of the list.
One thing that always struct me in Star Trek is their obsession in providing ever more inhabitable area for their citizens.
It always seemed to me the Federation is suffering massive overpopulation problems: - They keep colonizing new planets, terraforming them in the process.
Preference for replicated food isn't a grandpa Sisko thing.
It comes up repeatedly, for a whole bunch of different characters, and almost always in the context of drastic quality differences.
I'm not buying the placebo effect here.
There is a point made during a TNG episode that replicated food isnt even "the original stuff, but recreated".
This indicates that all replicated food is merely rearranged premade stuff with flavor and texture added.
A replicated carrot will be fake, not the actual copy of a carrot.
And all of these foods will ALWAYS be good for your health.
Little wonder Pa Sisko prefers the real stuff.
The DS9 barter episode is more of a one-off light-hearted episode than a suggestion for how the economy of the future works.
Actually, it feels like a repeat from an earlier season 1st?
Actually, it feels like a repeat from an earlier season 1st?
All three barter episodes are involving Nog, and all three plots are relatively successful.
My favourite is In The Cards The problem is that Gene Roddenbury was a very bad writer and people have tried to fix the world he made.
If you want a less painful look at post scarcity society, pick up a Culture novel.
You can't really change all the underpinnings of society, and still expect everything to play out more or less the same.
Society will be different.
The good works of fiction are those that explore and develop the changes wrought by these new developments.
In fact, when those are scientific development, that's what constitutes science fiction.
This is why Star Trek is not sci-fi.
It just has a teleporter instead of horses, and phasers instead of lances.
Ah, as I read down, I see others have come to similar points.
Back from a lengthy vacation from Giantitp.
I've been dabbling with 3d printer technology and game design, PM if you're curious.
I prefer to call it world optimization.
Having a single medium of exchange doesn't make a society less advanced or less able to focus on what's fulfilling in life โ€” in fact, it's pretty much the opposite, since it gives you more freedom to spend your time as you wish.
Yes, theoretically, you can build a modern society without a medium of exchange, but no-one does it, because it's horribly inefficient.
Actually I asked two questions: The second one was "Must everything that remains scarce be commoditized and traded based on a single medium of exchange?
I argue you can see 1 and 2 even in pockets of a lot of contemporary society.
Many people choose jobs and careers for self-fulfillment reasons, not pure money.
Many people with wealth don't want the biggest houses, the rarest art, and so on.
There's a ton of people who acquire a lot of wealth, live fairly modestly, and give a lot away to universities, charities, and relatives I've good 5 star free slots community speaking enough of the paperwork to know that's fairly common.
I guess those who spend big tend to make a big scene and makes people think its more common than it is.
Star Trek is totally inconsistent as to whether the so-called post scarcity economy even EXISTS, much less whether it works.
In short, the large body of evidence says that there IS money in the Federation and that anybody that said otherwise was just mouthing the party line.
Is it contradictory or is there a ideology that they are enlightened and post-scarcity?
Anyway, my positions is that the important point is that there is simply a lot of people in the Federation aren't that concerned about money and stuff.
That's just the way the society was built.
You can't really change all the underpinnings of society, and still expect everything to play out more or less the same.
Society will be different.
The good works of fiction are those that explore and develop the changes wrought by these new developments.
In fact, when those are scientific development, that's what constitutes science fiction.
This is why Star Trek is not sci-fi.
It just has a teleporter instead of horses, and phasers instead of lances.
Ah, as I read down, I see others have come to similar points.
I think you are going way too far here.
Just because Star Trek doesn't delve deep into economics and science and posits huge cultural changes doesn't mean what its doing isn't science fiction.
Its merely a lighter, more watchable, more popular sort of sci-fi than a "hard slots five star fiction" novel.
Its not like hard sci-fi is going to get things anywhere close to right or deal with all the implications either.
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar Actually I asked two questions: The second one was "Must everything that remains scarce be commoditized and traded based on a single medium of exchange?
I argue you can see 1 and 2 even in pockets of a lot of contemporary society.
Many people choose jobs and careers for self-fulfillment reasons, not pure money.
Many people with wealth don't want the biggest houses, the rarest art, and so on.
There's a ton of people who acquire a lot of wealth, live fairly modestly, and give a lot away to universities, charities, and relatives I've handled enough of the paperwork star wars force unleashed bonus mission know that's fairly common.
I guess those who spend big tend to make a big scene and makes people think its more common than it is.
Is it starbucks codes for for stars or is there a ideology that they are enlightened and post-scarcity?
Anyway, my positions is that the important point is that there is simply a lot of people in the Federation aren't that concerned about money and stuff.
That's just the way the society was built.
I think you are going way too far here.
Just because Star Trek doesn't delve deep into economics and science and posits huge cultural changes doesn't mean what its doing isn't science fiction.
Its merely a lighter, more watchable, more popular sort of sci-fi than a "hard science fiction" novel.
Its not like hard sci-fi is going to get things anywhere close to right or deal with all the implications either.
Being 'unconcerned' with money and focused on self-fulfillment doesn't magically invalidate the fact that currency exists because it makes any kind of material transactions MASSIVELY more convenient for all parties involved.
Not using a currency means that any kind of transaction is significantly more complicated, and potentially impossible in a large number of cases.
The fact that acquiring money isn't a primary concern does not remove the utility of currency for a society.
Transcending greed and acquisition of material wealth as a driving force for a society is perfectly reasonable.
Eliminating currency completely is utterly idiotic and completely counter-productive.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
I already conceded that point a little bit above.
Money is a highly useful concept for satisfying systems of demand, fine enough.
It's useful enough that where real money doesn't do the job or is impractical, large organizations sometimes create their own fake money.
Credit systems are used in place of cash sometimes for large organization transactions.
To crib from another poster "it's a matter of logistics.
The bright and rosy future of a post-utopian post-scarcity society is envisionable all the way until the plot demands some pocket of evil develop internally.
Hey, you can be a sci-fi, and post-scarcity socialist-utopian, AND still be a popular tv drama.
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar I already conceded that point a little bit above.
Money is a highly useful concept for satisfying systems of demand, fine enough.
It's useful enough that where real money doesn't do the job or is impractical, large organizations sometimes create their own fake money.
Credit systems are used in place of cash sometimes for large organization transactions.
To crib from another poster "it's a matter of logistics.
The bright and rosy future of a post-utopian post-scarcity society is envisionable all the way until the plot demands some pocket of evil develop internally.
Hey, you can be a sci-fi, and post-scarcity socialist-utopian, AND still be a popular tv drama.
The point is that the party line is that the Federation doesn't use money, and that representatives of Starfleet express disdain and disbelief at the undeveloped rubes that still use it.
Both Picard and Kirk outright stated that money DID NOT EXIST anymore, and Nog stated that the Federation had abandoned currency based economics.
The whole idea of no money is based on Roddenberry's poorly thought out concept that money only exists because of greed, and if we weren't greedy we wouldn't need money.
Which is just ridiculous.
Money is simply one focal point for greed, not the cause of it, and it is a focal point for greed because of currency's inherent utility in a society.
Money is, by itself, completely useless, the only thing it is useful free star 2019 is exchanging it for actual items of use.
In short, the idea of a no money society is patently ridiculous, but stated unambiguously by multiple characters, and yet at every turn the show is quietly forced to admit in the background that it's a dumb codes for google play music that isn't actually possible.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
The point is that the party line is that the Federation doesn't use money, and that representatives of Starfleet express disdain and disbelief at the undeveloped rubes that still use it.
Both Picard and Kirk outright stated that money DID NOT EXIST anymore, and Nog stated that the Federation had abandoned currency based economics.
In TOS, there were numerous references to money, at least codes for google play music the figurative sense.
Now, if I were to justify the idea rather than just dismiss it as a silly imposition from Roddenberry, I'd https://free-slots-money.website/star/kansas-star-casino-best-slots.html that the Federation doesn't use money per se, but rather deals in the exertion of energy itself instead and has not yet grown to the limits of its technology and hence is a "post-scarcity" society, at least within its member worlds and on its starships.
As such, barring an emergency, the Federation is capable of producing all of the needs of all of its citizens without worrying about economic transactions, and so as a society they only need to consider money when dealing with external parties like the Ferengi.
There is a point made during a TNG episode that replicated food isnt even "the original stuff, but recreated".
This indicates that all replicated food is merely rearranged premade stuff with flavor and texture added.
A replicated carrot will be fake, not the actual copy of a carrot.
And all of these foods will ALWAYS be good for your health.
Little wonder Pa Sisko prefers the real stuff.
While I was looking things up on this I'm inclined to believe there's at least one "replicated food isn't as good as the real thing" discussion that someone says, "but it's molecularly identical!
Which actually makes me more inclined to buy in to the mass mind control fanon.
Blue Eyes Black Lotus!
Does it like, summon a.
What would that card even do!?
Completely unviable in actual play, so don't worry about it.
I'm thinking at this point we are just making two very different points that are not necessarily incompatible with each other.
If Star Trek admits it uses money, and I admit it uses money, then all that's left is whether I'll engage the notion of whether "a no money society" is ridiculous I've said my piece, money could be used in limited ways without being all-pervasiveor you will engage the notion that a Star Trek society, of the sort that was actually displayed and that I spoke about rather than something that might have been in Gene's head briefly is plausible.
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar Being 'unconcerned' with money and focused on self-fulfillment doesn't magically invalidate the fact read more currency exists because it makes any kind of material transactions MASSIVELY more convenient for all parties involved.
Not using a currency means that any kind of transaction is significantly more complicated, and potentially impossible in a large number of cases.
What material transactions does the average Federation citizen make?
Food's free, clothing's free, housing's free, medical treatment's free, entertainment's free, art supplies are free, work supplies are free; what else is there?
Your average citizen isn't going to be buying a starship, no matter how much money they have.
What's with the brianwashing talk?
The Federation always depicted is a paragon for a government built on morality and recognition of human rights.
It is a very point of view sort of thing.
If someone thinks money is bad, and you agree with that, you will think that it is good they think that way.
You might even go as far to think that the single way they think is ''obviously right'', just as you agree with it.
But it only works if you agree.
However, for the most part, the role of non-Utopian realists, anarchists, and other types that disagree with the way the Yet star trek slot machine free reserve does things, comes from aliens and the occasional human-looking people who never joined the Federation.
Well, of course Federation people are barinwashed not to rebel.
And really, for all the hype, Star Trek is full of disagreements.
The disagreement about the Prime Directive fills tons of episodes, for example.
And there are a lot of episodes where ''crewperson X disagrees with the orders''.
The word you're looking for is "socialized," and every society does it.
No need to invoke operant conditioning or torture.
It might be ''socializing'' if you agree with it, but it is ''brainwashing'' if you don't.
The DS9 barter episode is more of a one-off light-hearted episode than a suggestion for how the economy of the future works.
Note it is not the ''one DS9 barter episode'', it comes up a lot during the show.
You want a super serious heavy hearted example: Sisko must batter with the alien to get a Cardassian Data Rod so that he can trick the Romulanins into joining the war, by giving that alien ''bio gel''.
And even the other alien gets a barter with ''I''l get you out of jail, if you do a job for me.
Food's free, clothing's free, housing's free, medical treatment's angry wars star bonus birds, entertainment's free, art supplies are free, work supplies are free; what else is there?
Your average citizen isn't going to be buying a starship, no matter how much money they have.
Literally anything that does not come out of a replicator - many, MANY things are either not replicable or explicitly more desirable when natural food and drink in particular.
So various amounts, depending on the citizen.
And regardless of the frequency, it is simple fact that a currency based transaction is the most efficient manner of getting anything you don't have.
Live off the replicator and don't want anything else?
No need for you to ever touch money.
But for a SOCIETY to claim they have no money is simply ridiculous, especially when at every turn people admit that yeah they actually do use money.
How exactly do you think Sisko Sr ensures a steady supply of all of the necessary foodstuffs to run his restaurant?
How would somebody with the dream of opening a restaurant get the rights to the land in an appropriate location to set up a restaurant?
Housing being 'free' simply ignores the fact that location of housing is a significant factor for many people and is not something that can ever be re-created.
There simply is not enough space on the southern California coast for everybody who wants one to live in a house there.
Not everybody can live in a house with a view of the Eiffel Tower.
Not everybody can live in a cabin in the wilderness.
So claiming that housing is 'free' completely ignores the fact that even if every house were an exact replica, the location would make them more or less desirable star trek money doesnt exist people.
So how exactly do you think people get housing in desirable locations?
And starships aren't actually that rare.
Sure a normal citizen isn't going to buy a ship the size of the Enterprise.
But there are MANY small shuttles and transports that are not particularly hard to imagine a normal person who dedicates a reasonable amount of dedication towards the goal of owning a starship to be able to buy something the size of Quark's shuttle.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
While I was looking things up on this I'm inclined to believe there's at least one "replicated food isn't as good as the real thing" discussion that someone says, "but it's molecularly identical!
Which actually makes me more inclined to buy in to the mass mind control fanon.
Well one major factor in a replicator would be that you get an exactly identical item out of the replicator every time you use that pattern.
Want a glass of wine out of the replicator?
It's going to taste exactly the same every time.
It's cooked and seasoned exactly the same every time.
You're getting the exact same mix every time.
Want a glass of hot tea?
It comes out exactly the same mix and exactly the same temperature every time and if you asked for a glass of water and a teabag you're getting the exact same teabag every time.
A lot of what people enjoy about food is that the same meal can be prepared many different ways and yield different tastes.
A medium rare ribeye steak cooked by one chef may taste completely different from one prepared by another.
Even with the same chef it's going to have variance in it due to differences in ingredients, temperatures, cook times, etc.
Even if prepared in exactly the same way a steak from a corn-fed cow from Iowa is going to taste different from a grass fed cow from Texas.
But a replicator you are getting everything the same every time, down to the molecule.
That would get really boring really fast.
Even if you have different patterns for the same meal you still get that exact variation every time.
Then of course there is the next factor that apparently patterns have been tweaked to be healthier.
So if you enjoy a steak with a lot of fat you're just out of luck getting it from a replicator.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
Literally anything that does not come out of a replicator - many, MANY things are either not replicable or explicitly more desirable when natural food and drink in particular.
So various amounts, depending on the citizen.
And regardless of the frequency, it is simple fact that a currency based transaction is the most efficient manner of getting anything you don't have.
Live off the replicator and don't want anything else?
No need for you to ever touch money.
But for a SOCIETY to claim they have no money is simply ridiculous, especially when at every turn people admit that yeah they actually do use money.
How exactly do you think Sisko Sr ensures a steady supply of all of the necessary foodstuffs to run his restaurant?
How would somebody with the dream of opening a restaurant get the rights to the land in an appropriate location to set up a restaurant?
Housing being 'free' simply ignores the fact that location of housing is a significant factor for many people and is not something that can ever be re-created.
There simply is not enough space on the southern California coast for everybody who wants one to live in a house there.
Not everybody can live in a house with a view of the Eiffel Tower.
Not everybody can live in a cabin in the wilderness.
So claiming that housing is 'free' completely ignores the fact that even if every house were an exact replica, the location would make them more or less desirable to people.
So how exactly do you think people get housing in desirable locations?
And starships aren't actually that rare.
Sure a normal citizen isn't going to buy a ship the size of the Enterprise.
But there are MANY small shuttles and transports that are not particularly hard to imagine a normal person click to see more dedicates a reasonable amount of dedication towards the goal of owning a starship to be able to buy something the size of Quark's shuttle.
I agree that scarcity probably still exists in the Federation, even though the vast majority of what someone needs to live are provided for free within the Federation, and that currencies and markets are the most efficient method of allocating those resources.
However, it doesn't mean that the Federation needs to have money, but instead that the Federation has to have some kind of system in place to allocate those resources and ensure that society continues progressing and the necessary work continues to be done.
In the real world, there are a few places that we consider it abhorrent to charge money or have a currency-based system; organ donation and organ transplant is one.
We simply don't have enough information to know how the Federation economy works, mostly because the series follows military members who live on a ship or outside the Federation and rarely does anyone meet a normal citizen of the Federation.
We don't know what the average citizen does for work or even if they have to work.
We don't know how housing is determined.
It could be done via a voucher or a point system or it could be centrally planned or if the citizen just lives in their mom's basement until they join Starfleet or a colony.
For all its travel to the final frontier, Star Trek doesn't spend much time on home.
Literally anything that does not come out of a replicator - many, MANY things are either not replicable or explicitly more desirable when natural food and drink in particular.
So go to a restaurant, where the chef will prepare a meal and give source to you for free, for the simple joy of preparing and serving food.
How exactly do you think Sisko Sr ensures a steady supply of all of the necessary foodstuffs to run his restaurant?
How would somebody with the dream of opening a restaurant get the rights to the land in an appropriate location to set up a restaurant?
He asks farmers, who are growing food for the simple joy of it, to provide him with ingredients.
In a pinch, he can use replicated ingredients-differences in preparation will prevent the final products from being identical.
For the restaurant, you ask the city planner if you can have a restaurant, and the city planner finds a recently vacated building and turns it into a restaurant for you.
Housing being 'free' simply ignores the fact that location of housing is a significant factor for many people and is not something that can ever be re-created.
There simply is not enough space on the southern California coast for everybody who wants one to live in a house there.
Not everybody can live in a house with a view of the Eiffel Tower.
Not everybody can live in a cabin in the wilderness.
So claiming that housing is 'free' completely ignores the fact that even if every house were an exact replica, the location would make them more or less desirable to people.
So how exactly do you think people get housing in desirable locations?
I'm not confident in your assertion that there isn't enough room for people, especially given that beautiful coastline is available throughout the quadrant does it really have to be southern California specifically?
You let the city planner in Paris know what you're looking for, and the first time such a place becomes available, it's yours.
And starships aren't actually that rare.
Sure a normal citizen isn't going to buy a ship the size of the Enterprise.
But there are MANY small shuttles and transports that are not particularly hard to imagine a normal person who dedicates a reasonable amount of dedication towards the goal of owning a starship to be able to buy something the size of Quark's shuttle.
Even shuttles; what percentage of the population do you think want one?
What are they going to do with it?
I'd figure for shuttles it's gonna be a small enough portion of the population that they can be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and handed out to those who have a need for them and withheld from those who don't.
But a replicator you are getting everything the same every time, down to the molecule.
That would get really boring really fast.
I think that's more of a matter of taste.
What the hey, pun intended.
There's probably a fair amount of people who don't care about having their taste buds blown off meal after meal, and having the options of different foods is variant enough to continue reading care about variance within the same food.
Maybe I'm just not good enough at tasting things, but it sounds er, pun intended, again like the old analog music is richer than digital music discussion: sure, whatever floats your boat, but I'll stick with the inferior product with which I don't see the problem.
And really, if the quality is that noticeable, you'd think they'd be bored about breathing the same air all day everyday.
Blue Eyes Black Lotus!
Does it like, summon a.
What would that card even do!?
Completely unviable in actual play, so don't worry about it.
Scott by Amber E.
Scott by Amber E.
Scott by Rich Burlew by Rich Burlew codes for google play music Rich Burlew Usage of this site, including but not limited to making or editing a post or private message or the creation of an account, constitutes acceptance of the.

CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

12 Star Trek Gadgets That Now Exist. BY John Brandon.. Star Trek. And the future, it turns out, is coming sooner than even Trek's writers could have imagined.. Doesnโ€™t seem possible,.


Enjoy!
United Federation of Planets - Wikipedia
Valid for casinos
How does money work in Star Trek? - Page 3
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
star trek money doesnt exist

A67444455
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

In Star Trek: First Contact, Picard plainly says that there is no money in the future: Picard: The economics of the future are somewhat different. You see, money doesn't exist in the twenty-fourth century. Lily: No money! That means you don't get paid. Picard: The acquisition of wealth is no longer the driving force in our lives. We work to.


Enjoy!
How does money work in Star Trek? - Page 17
Valid for casinos
How does money work in Star Trek? - Page 3
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
star trek money doesnt exist

T7766547
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Nobody works for a living in the Star Trek Federation since the concept of money does not exist. Without money as a medium of exchange, how does the Federation conduct trade with the other worlds? I cannot imagine how the money-minded Ferengis would want to have any dealings with humans if no money is involved.


Enjoy!
How can the world function without money in Star Trek? What is the motivation to work? How can a currency free society work and what are we doing to get there? Is there anyone working on replicator technology right now? - Quora
Valid for casinos
United Federation of Planets - Wikipedia
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
star trek money doesnt exist

B6655644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

The utopian future of 'Star Trek' doesn't work without extreme inequality and some slavery. Joseph Gargiulo.. because "Trek" is a future where money no longer exists, people work because they.


Enjoy!
star trek money | eBay
Valid for casinos
How does money work in Star Trek? - Page 17
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
Hubble Spots Thousands of Objects Traveling Faster Than Light

BN55TO644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

Other than the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Living Witness," the Trek universe has never gone this far head for very long. But now, after the events of the Season 2 finale, "Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2" the USS Discovery will have to explore this strange, new world of the future on its own. But what will that look like?


Enjoy!
star trek money | eBay
Valid for casinos
How does money work in Star Trek? - Page 3
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
How can the world function without money in Star Trek?
What is the motivation to work?
How can a codes for google play music free society work and codes for google play music are we doing to get there?
Is there anyone working on replicator technology right now?
Some features may not work correctly.
check this out can the world function without money in Star Trek?
What is the motivation to work?
How can a currency free society work and what are we doing to get there?
Is there anyone working on replicator technology right now?
Scarcity At the moment, resources are scarce which means we star trek money doesnt exist to allocate them somehow.
Society uses money to do that efficiently and we all end up on the merry-go-round: Post Scarcity Because of the unlimited energy and replication technology in Star Trek, effectively unlimited resources are available to all those who need them.
There is no poverty and no hunger.
There's no need to work to get money to buy things.
It's just a big, ole box.
There is the question of persons of unlimited star trek money doesnt exist, who wish to collect 'everything' just to have more than the next guy.
What about inherently scarce goods?
Star Trek: we actually will always have Paris.
Why would anyone work to 'better the rest of humanity'?
Most people probably don't, and there's no need for them to do so - they can spend their lives on the holodeck having fun if they want.
What do you mean you don't do frozen Margaritas?
But there are always people who are driven to achieve.
Without money as the mechanism for measuring that achievement, their motivation becomes either personal satisfaction, society's plaudits, or status and reputation.
This is similar to the way university professors or artists operate today.
Why would anyone be a red shirt?
It's easy enough to see why the officers want pawn stars terminator slot machine jobs, but why the low level transporter operators etc.?
Presumably, they hope to get promoted to the better jobs.
Possibly it's not the most apologise, all star casino no deposit bonus codes opinion aspect of the show; humdrum jobs would be more likely to be handled by the ship's computers However, any group of people will include a small number of very adventurous people, the kinds of people who do extreme sports now.
Starfleet isn't that big and has the huge population base of the Federation to draw on.
Only a small percentage need to have the drive to join.

CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

In the immortal words of Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Star Trek shows a post-scarcity society - the combination of practically unlimited energy (from antimatter/matter reactions focused through dilithium crystals) and replication technology means t...


Enjoy!
star trek money | eBay
Valid for casinos
money - Why and how did the Star Trek Universe evolve to a cashless/commerce-less society? - Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
Commonly referred to as "the Federation", it was introduced in the television show 1966-1969.
The survival, success, and growth of the Federation and its principles of freedom have become some of the Star Trek 's central themes.
The Federation is an organization of numerous sovereignties, and although viewers are never told about the internal workings star trek money doesnt exist the government, many episodes refer to the rules and laws that the Federation imposes on codes for google play music characters and their adventures.
Bases visited in the series were labeled "Earth Outposts".
In August of 1966, was hired by as a writer for Star Trek.
Actor credits Coon with injecting the concepts ofand the United Federation of Planets into the show.
One of the first Coon was credited with was "", where an ambassador on the Enterprise is referred to as a Federation official.
Eventually, with the series as allegory here the current events of the 1960s, the creators were able to portray tensions with the Federation resembling NATO and the the.
https://free-slots-money.website/star/kansas-star-casino-best-slots.html debate has centered around how realistic is the "post-scarcity" economy of the Federation that has evolved beyond government-controlled monetary systems.
It has been described, along with the series as a whole, as a vehicle to explore what it means to be human, as well as exploring mankind's efforts to build a better society.
Other writers have noted that Star Trek's Federation has the same logistical and philosophical difficulties of other utopian economic and political schemes that make it seem unrealistic.
Many contemporary terms are assigned to the Federation, but parallels to current government bodies and their roles and responsibilities are pure speculation on the part of fans and critics.
Some non-canon works assert that founding member Alpha Centauri is home to a human race transplanted by the Preservers from classical third-century BC Greece known as, variously, the Centaurans, the Centaurians, or the Centauri.
The 1980-to-2188 historical guide posits the Federation as being incorporated at 'the first Babel Interplanetary Conference' in 2087.
In books such as the Star Trek Star Fleet Technical Manual and the novel Articles of the Federation, the Federation's founding document is the Articles of Federation.
New York: Pocket Books.
Das June 23, 2011.
Retrieved January 25, 2016.
Retrieved January 25, 2016.
Retrieved January 25, 2016.
Retrieved January 25, 2016.
By using this site, you agree to the and.
Wikipediaยฎ is a registered trademark of thea non-profit organization.

G66YY644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

15 Star Trek Gadgets That Exist In Real Life.. doesnโ€™t successfully feel as advanced and futuristic as it did at the time of the original show. Considering the.


Enjoy!
How does money work in Star Trek? - Page 17
Valid for casinos
Currency - Official Star Trek Online Wiki
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
star trek money doesnt exist

CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

The truth is, you can forget about a transporter. No one has been able to realize such a concept. But that doesn't mean some of the ideas that seemed far-fetched when the show debuted in 1966 haven't become a reality. In this article, we feature the top 10 technologies from Star Trek that actually did come to fruition, listed in no particular.


Enjoy!
How can the world function without money in Star Trek? What is the motivation to work? How can a currency free society work and what are we doing to get there? Is there anyone working on replicator technology right now? - Quora
Valid for casinos
star trek money | eBay
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
star trek money doesnt exist

G66YY644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Star Trek Online Saves The Day. Fans were eager to hear news that in the mid 2000โ€™s that Perpetual Entertainment was developing an new IP based on Star Trek called Star Trek Online. Its promise was to create a fully interactive MMORPG based on the Star Trek universe. Artwork was released for the game showing examples of what players were to.


Enjoy!
money - Why and how did the Star Trek Universe evolve to a cashless/commerce-less society? - Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange
Valid for casinos
Currency - Official Star Trek Online Wiki
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
star trek money doesnt exist

B6655644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

Maybe it was because Kirk said that they donโ€™t: > Dr. Gillian Taylor: Don't tell me they don't use money in the 23rd Century. James T. Kirk: Well, we don't.


Enjoy!
How can the world function without money in Star Trek? What is the motivation to work? How can a currency free society work and what are we doing to get there? Is there anyone working on replicator technology right now? - Quora
Valid for casinos
United Federation of Planets - Wikipedia
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
star trek money doesnt exist

BN55TO644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

Star Wars and Star Trek: The Fandom That Men Pretend Doesnโ€™t Exist Rachel Leishman April 6, 2017 0 Comment 0 When it comes to the fandoms of Star Wars and Star Trek, most men pretend that there isnโ€™t a certain history to each.


Enjoy!
money - Why and how did the Star Trek Universe evolve to a cashless/commerce-less society? - Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange
Valid for casinos
star trek money | eBay
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
How Far Can We Go? Limits of Humanity.

G66YY644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

The 'Star Trek Beyond' Post-Credits Scene Doesn't Exist, Sadly. as the official announcement of Star Trek 4 stated that the fourth film would find Captain. Star Trek Beyond doesn't give us.


Enjoy!
money - Why and how did the Star Trek Universe evolve to a cashless/commerce-less society? - Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange
Valid for casinos
Currency - Official Star Trek Online Wiki
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
School

B6655644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

12 Star Trek Gadgets That Now Exist. BY John Brandon.. Star Trek. And the future, it turns out, is coming sooner than even Trek's writers could have imagined.. Doesnโ€™t seem possible,.


Enjoy!
How does money work in Star Trek? - Page 3
Valid for casinos
star trek money | eBay
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
What Could NASA Do With Double The Budget?

BN55TO644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

Re: How does money work in Star Trek? Except for that one bit in Realm of Fear where we see that Barclay is conscious and interacting with the environment while he's in the middle between transmitter and receiver, when he should be a non-living stream of particles at that point.


Enjoy!
How can the world function without money in Star Trek? What is the motivation to work? How can a currency free society work and what are we doing to get there? Is there anyone working on replicator technology right now? - Quora
Valid for casinos
How does money work in Star Trek? - Page 17
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
You will have to before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.
As pointed out, the short answer is "it doesn't work at all", because the whole concept of a post-scarcity society doesn't really make sense.
You have advanced technology and a big food surplus?
But that doesn't make your economy 'post-scarcity' any more than ours is.
All the major resources โ€” energy, space, raw materials, labour, knowledge, time โ€” are still limited, so if you want something you don't have, what are you going to do?
DS9 actually demonstrated this in an unintentionally hilarious way.
There's an episode where O'Brien needs some techno-widget to get the Defiant running on time.
He doesn't have one, but with Rom's help he finds out that some guy on another starship has his techno-widget.
To get his techno-widget he needs another thing to trade to the starship, and to get that thing he has to trade for another thing, and to get that thing he needs to trade for another thing, and at the end of a ludicrously complicated chain of deals and a vast amount of stress, he finally gets his widget.
This is called "barter", and it was invented sometime before recorded history.
The reason that it isn't the standard method of trade anymore is that humanity figured out several thousand years ago that life was a lot easier if instead of having to trade individually for everything you needed, you could just use commonly accepted medium of exchange.
The word we use for this medium of exchange is "money".
Which means that economically, the Federation is around three thousand years less advanced than we are.
Yes, but DS9 also provided the answer for how money works.
The accepted currency of most of the Federation is Latinum - a rare, non-replicable material that seems to have no other use which is the ideal material to use for currency.
The Federation simply refuses to USE an official currency - and honestly given Starfleet's reaction to anybody that asks how they get by, they refuse to use a currency because to actually adopt a currency would mean actually admitting that they aren't as awesome and wholesome and advanced as they like to tell people.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high codes for google play music it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
Yes, but DS9 also provided the answer for how money works.
The accepted currency of most of the Federation is Latinum - a rare, non-replicable material that seems to have no other use which is the ideal material to use for currency.
The Federation simply refuses to USE an official currency - and honestly given Starfleet's reaction to anybody that asks how they get by, they refuse to use a currency because to actually adopt a currency would mean actually admitting that they aren't as awesome and wholesome and advanced as they like to tell people.
I thought latinum was only used as a currency outside of the Federation, since DS9 covers what's essentially a Bajoran station out on the frontier.
Within the Federation itself, there could be a currency system in place that the citizens themselves don't think of as "money" since it doesn't cover any of the material essentials that a Federation citizens needs and the Federation and its citizens only uses latinum for trade with other cultures.
As pointed out, the short answer is "it doesn't work at all", because the whole concept of a post-scarcity society doesn't really make sense.
You have advanced technology and a big food surplus?
But that doesn't make your economy 'post-scarcity' any more than ours is.
All the major resources โ€” energy, space, raw materials, labour, knowledge, time โ€” are still limited, so if you want something you don't have, what are you going to do?
DS9 actually demonstrated this in an unintentionally hilarious way.
There's an episode where O'Brien needs some techno-widget to get the Defiant running on time.
He doesn't have one, but with Rom's help he finds out that some guy on another starship has his techno-widget.
To get his techno-widget he needs another thing to trade to the starship, and to get that thing he has to trade for another thing, and to get that thing he needs to trade for another codes for google play music, and at the end of a ludicrously complicated chain of deals and a vast amount of stress, he finally gets his widget.
This is called "barter", and it was invented sometime before recorded history.
The reason that it isn't the standard method of trade anymore is that humanity figured out several thousand years ago that life was a lot easier if instead of having to trade individually for everything you needed, you could just use commonly accepted medium of exchange.
The word we use for this medium of exchange is "money".
Which means that economically, the Federation is around three thousand years less advanced than we are.
It seems like it's a failure of Starfleet Logistics, rather than the Federation economy, since every person along the way is a member of Starfleet and ideally should be solving these kinds of problems and there should be a system in place to solve this.
I don't think many modern day intra-organization logistics operate on a currency basis, but I could be wrong.
I thought latinum was only used as a currency outside of the Federation, since DS9 covers what's essentially a Bajoran station out on the frontier.
Within the Federation itself, there could be a currency system in place that the citizens themselves don't think of as "money" since it doesn't cover any of https://free-slots-money.website/star/5-star-free-slots-community.html material essentials that a Federation citizens needs and only uses latinum for trade with other cultures.
It seems like it's a failure of Starfleet Logistics, rather than the Federation economy, since every person along the way is a member of Starfleet and ideally should be solving these kinds of problems and there should be a system in place to solve this.
I don't think many modern day intra-organization logistics operate on a currency basis, but I could be wrong.
There was a lot more than that.
There was SOMETHING involving trading General Martok's cases of blood wine to somebody, and then getting a different vintage of blood wine back.
He also disappeared on a runabout for an undisclosed reason.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
The ironic thing I've always enjoyed is that, at the end of the day, Gene's view of a perfect human society is basically the Ferengi.
What his weird and awful ideas would create in reality would be them.
I really just don't get what you are talking about here.
As pointed out, the short answer is "it doesn't work at all", because the whole concept of a post-scarcity society doesn't really make sense.
You have advanced technology and a big food surplus?
But that doesn't make your economy 'post-scarcity' any more than ours is.
All the major resources โ€” energy, space, raw materials, labour, knowledge, time โ€” are still limited, so if you want something you don't have, what are you going to do?
As I mentioned contra this sort of view just above, the basic resources: food, clothing, shelter, basic materials, most tools, even education and recreation, are to be had in abundance, and I don't see why that cannot be the foundation for a society where the majority of people feels like they are rich and not obligated to vigorously compete for the few rare resources.
Apparently, you can get a small apartment in San Francisco but perhaps you need a job there first.
There are plenty of times and places that used other systems for regulating land.
I understand that energy is not unlimited, but there seems to be enough of it for most people's daily needs!
So too goes for raw materials.
The notion that labour saving devices somehow created a surplus of time may seem odd to 21st century people.
I don't understand why you think knowledge is particularly scarce.
Expert knowledge exists of course, but what exactly do people need that is hard to come by in this future?
Not medicine except for treatments of rare space diseasesnot food, etc etc.
The DS9 barter episode is more of a one-off light-hearted episode than a suggestion for how the economy of the future works.
Someone did mention logistics.
However, now you are getting well into fridge logic territory, well I wanted to point out there is a surface reasonableness to how humanity functions.
Is it truly that hard to envision a far future hyper-advanced society where people, by and large, are actually be more interested in what's truly fulfilling in life rather than accumulating stuff?
Must everything that remains scarce be commoditized and traded based on a single medium of exchange?
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar I really just don't get what you are talking about here.
To say that Gene Roddenbury, the creator of Star Trek, was a horrible pervert who didn't understand the implications of a lot of what he was writing.
I stand firm by my belief that his death was the best thing that happened to Star Trek, and this entire money problem we're discussing is basically rooted in it.
Sorry, I'll stop being all grognardy now I have heard enough about the creator god of Star Trek to know he had some pretty weird and wacked-out views.
I think talking about his beliefs, expressed views, prejudices and star wars galaxy of heroes money comments my own ill-educated view is those four are probably contradictory both with themselves and each other is its own potentially already having been banned thread.
Not only do I think such a society is imaginable, but that there isn't anything particularly special of imagining a society that is motivated by something other than greed.
Heck, most major characters across media are mainly directed by ideals or family or something other than money, and that's also true about many fictional societies whether money exists or not.
Maybe money has to exist or its existence is good for somethings the information science behind that being the most efficient form of satisfying demand is darn close to being true by sheer logicbut a society built on money on the other hand.
In envisioning such a society of the future.
Star Trek isn't obviously wrong and it's also hardly unique.
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar To say that Gene Roddenbury, the creator of Star Trek, was a horrible pervert who didn't understand the implications of a lot of what he was writing.
I stand firm by my belief that his death was the best thing that happened to Star Trek, and this entire money problem we're discussing is basically rooted in it.
Sorry, I'll stop being all grognardy now I'd agree that his notions about good television were poor; the fact that the crew couldn't argue among themselves and that humanity had to be cast in the best light was stifling for the show.
I remember Rick Berman saying he had a bust of Roddenberry and he'd blindfold his eyes whenever he broke one of Roddenberry's rules.
That said, the show at the very beginning was remarkably innovative and Roddenberry's vision of a completely multi-ethnic, multi-national crew was pioneering at the time.
My eyes mist whenever I read anything by Nichelle Nichols, George Takei, or any of the numerous people whose lives were touched by Star Trek.
I'm sure Roddenberry would have disapproved of my favorite Trek, DS9.
There was a lot more than that.
There was SOMETHING involving trading General Martok's cases of blood wine to somebody, and then getting a different vintage of blood wine back.
He also disappeared on a runabout for an undisclosed reason.
My head canon has Nogg exploiting O'Brien's credentials to do all sorts of other profitable things in addition to getting the part that O'Brien needed ; Star trek money doesnt exist agree that his notions about good television were poor; the fact that the crew couldn't argue among themselves and humanity cast in the best light was stifling for the show.
I remember Rick Berman saying he had a bust of Roddenberry and he'd blindfold his eyes whenever he broke one of Roddenberry's rules.
That said, star trek money doesnt exist show at the very beginning was remarkably innovative and Roddenberry's vision of a completely multi-ethnic, multi-national crew was pioneering at the time.
My eyes mist whenever I read anything by Nichelle Nichols, George Takei, or any of the numerous people whose lives were touched by Star Trek.
I'm sure Roddenberry would have disapproved of my favorite Trek, DS9.
My head canon has Nogg exploiting O'Brien's credentials to do all sorts of other profitable things in addition to getting the part that O'Brien needed ; The thing he created is far more outstanding then the man himself, and I guess that's the best legacy.
Because you're not wrong, on both how Star Trek was very innovative and inclusive on races.
Is it truly that hard to envision a far future hyper-advanced society where people, by and large, are actually be more interested in what's truly fulfilling in life rather than accumulating stuff?
Must everything that remains scarce be commoditized and traded based on a single medium of exchange?
This is what's known as a false dichotomy.
Having a single medium of exchange doesn't make a society less advanced or less able to focus on what's fulfilling in life โ€” in fact, it's pretty much the opposite, since it gives you more freedom to spend your time as you wish.
Yes, theoretically, you can build a modern society without a medium of exchange, but no-one does it, because it's horribly inefficient.
I'm the author of the series of urban fantasy novels.
I have heard enough about the creator god of Star Trek to know he had some pretty weird and wacked-out views.
I think talking about his beliefs, expressed views, prejudices and bigoted comments my own ill-educated view is those four are probably contradictory both with themselves and each other is its own potentially already having been banned thread.
Not only do I think such a society is imaginable, but that there isn't anything particularly special of imagining a society that is motivated by something other than greed.
Heck, most major characters across media are mainly directed by ideals or family or something other than money, and that's also true about many fictional societies whether money exists or not.
Maybe money has to exist or its existence is good for somethings the information science behind that being the most efficient form of satisfying demand is darn close to being true by sheer logicbut a society built on money on the other hand.
In envisioning such a society of the future.
Star Trek isn't obviously wrong and it's also hardly unique.
Star Trek is totally inconsistent as to whether the so-called post scarcity economy even EXISTS, much less whether it works.
The main problem is that there are a large number of things that simply cannot be created land, works of artmany more that simply cannot be created on a large enough scale to let everybody, or even most people, be able to have one starships, large housesmore extremely useful items that they explicitly cannot create dilithiumand even more that are less desirable when created from a replicator food and drinks.
Then, it features many instances of cast members across ALL the shows making explicit references to buying things and using Federation credits.
It features a large number of episodes with explicit poor people and extremely poor planets within the Federation.
It features a number of non-Starfleet Federation citizens working in extremely harsh or dangerous conditions that they would not possibly be doing because they enjoyed it mining in particular.
There are a large number of companies within the Federation that are explicitly motivated by profit.
The universe consistently tells many people that non-replicated food and beverages are still in very high demand and yet can't explain how these things are purchased without money.
There are many references made to trade deals but large scale trade is completely impossible without currency.
In short, the large body of evidence says that there IS money in the Federation and that anybody that said otherwise was just mouthing the party line.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
Copies of works of art are still works of art, they simply are not original works of art.
Artists in all art forms have been creating copies of originals for those who desire such for literally thousands of years.
Obtaining the original is relatively difficult - there's only one original of any given artwork, and, especially if the artist is famous or if works from the era in which the work you want originated are protected e.
Also, depending on how accurately you believe a replicator can recreate an object, it may well be possible to create copies of works of art source are virtually indistinguishable from the original even to experts using laboratory-grade tools to compare the copy and the original side-by-side, if the pattern the replicator used for the work was sufficiently accurate.
It's still not technically the original, and it might well be illegal to make a copy which is virtually indistinguishable from the original even in the supposedly money-free Federation, but it may well be possible.
There are many references made to trade deals but large scale trade is completely impossible without currency.
That's not entirely true.
Only if you have nothing that your potential trading partner is sufficiently interested in obtaining to bother working with you to establish exchange rates whether by precedent or negotiation.
Of course, because it's more difficult and less convenient to work without a common medium of exchange, people engaged in such trade might end up with a de facto currency even if there is no official currency, or make use of a currency from another region.
It seems like it's a failure of Starfleet Logistics, rather than the Federation economy, since every person along the way is a member of Starfleet and ideally should be solving these kinds of problems and there should be a system in place to solve this.
I don't think many modern day intra-organization logistics operate on a currency basis, but I could be wrong.
Yeah I don't see how currency would necessarily have solved this.
If I need machine A to do a task but machine A is being used be a different team, I generally can't find a monetary solution to this, within the company aside buying a new machine and even that probably wouldn't work within time constraints.
I MAY be able to trade favors to get access to it though.
This is really no different than what was happening on this episode.
As pointed out, the short answer is "it doesn't work at all", because the whole concept of a post-scarcity society doesn't really make sense.
You have advanced technology and a big food surplus?
But that doesn't make your economy 'post-scarcity' any more than ours is.
All the major resources โ€” energy, space, raw materials, labour, knowledge, time โ€” are still limited, so if you want something you don't have, what are you going to do?
DS9 actually demonstrated this in an unintentionally hilarious way.
There's an episode where O'Brien needs some techno-widget to get the Defiant running on time.
He doesn't have one, but with Rom's help he finds out that some guy on another starship has his techno-widget.
To get his techno-widget he needs another thing to trade to the money star atm, and to get that thing he has to trade for another thing, and to get that thing he needs to trade for another thing, and at the end of a ludicrously complicated chain of deals and a vast amount of stress, he finally gets his widget.
This is called "barter", and it was invented sometime before recorded history.
The reason that it isn't the standard method of trade anymore is that humanity figured out several thousand years ago that life was a lot easier if star trek money doesnt exist of having to trade individually for everything you needed, you could just use commonly accepted medium of exchange.
The word we use for this medium of exchange is "money".
Which means that economically, the Federation is around three thousand years less advanced than we are.
Remember that the lack of a Technothingy wasnt S.
It was an exceptional situation brought upon them by a Galactic-scale war that drew every supplies short.
The Technothingy was not exactly critical material the gravity fluctuated a bit, but not in a threatening manner so OBrian and the Defiant were simply put at the bottom of the list.
One thing that always struct me in Star Trek is their obsession in providing ever more inhabitable area for their citizens.
It always seemed to me the Visit web page is suffering massive overpopulation problems: - They keep colonizing new planets, terraforming them in the process.
Preference for replicated food isn't a grandpa Sisko thing.
It comes up repeatedly, for a whole bunch of different characters, and almost always in the context of drastic quality differences.
I'm not buying the placebo effect here.
There is a point made during a TNG episode that replicated food isnt even "the original stuff, but recreated".
This indicates that all replicated food is merely rearranged premade stuff with flavor and texture added.
A replicated carrot will be fake, not the actual copy of a carrot.
And all of these foods will ALWAYS be good for your health.
Little wonder Pa Sisko prefers the real stuff.
The DS9 barter episode is more of a one-off light-hearted episode than a suggestion for how the economy of the future works.
Actually, it feels like a repeat from an earlier season 1st?
Actually, it feels like a repeat from an earlier season 1st?
All three barter episodes are involving Nog, and all three plots are relatively successful.
My favourite is In The Cards The problem is that Gene Roddenbury was a very bad writer and people have tried to fix the world he made.
If you want a less painful look at post scarcity society, pick up a Culture novel.
You can't really change all the underpinnings of society, and still expect everything to play out more or less the same.
Society will be different.
The good works of fiction are those that explore and develop the changes wrought by these new developments.
In fact, when those are scientific development, that's what constitutes science fiction.
This is why Star Trek is not sci-fi.
It just has a teleporter instead of horses, and phasers instead of lances.
Ah, as I read down, I see others have come to similar points.
Back from a lengthy vacation from Giantitp.
I've been dabbling with 3d printer technology and game design, PM if you're curious.
I prefer to call it world optimization.
Having a single medium of exchange doesn't make a society less advanced or less able to focus on what's fulfilling in life โ€” in fact, it's pretty much the opposite, since it gives you more freedom to spend your time as you wish.
Yes, theoretically, you can build a modern society without a medium of exchange, but no-one does it, because it's horribly inefficient.
Actually I asked two questions: The second one was "Must everything that remains scarce be commoditized and traded based on a single medium of exchange?
I argue you can see 1 and 2 even in pockets of a lot of contemporary society.
Many people choose jobs and careers for self-fulfillment reasons, not pure money.
Many people with wealth don't want the biggest houses, the rarest art, and so on.
There's a ton of people who acquire a lot of wealth, live fairly modestly, and give a lot away to universities, charities, and relatives I've handled enough of the paperwork to know that's fairly common.
I guess those who spend big tend to make a big scene and makes people think its more common than it is.
Star Trek is totally inconsistent as to whether the continue reading post scarcity economy even EXISTS, much less whether it works.
In short, the large body of evidence says that there IS money in the Federation and that anybody that said otherwise was just mouthing the party line.
Is it contradictory or is there a ideology that they are enlightened and post-scarcity?
Anyway, my positions is that the important point is that there is simply a lot of people in the Federation aren't that concerned about money and stuff.
That's just the way the society was built.
You can't really change all the underpinnings of society, and still expect everything to play out more or less the same.
Society will be different.
The good works of fiction are those that explore and develop the changes wrought by these new developments.
In fact, when those are scientific development, that's what constitutes science fiction.
This is why Star Trek is not sci-fi.
It just has a teleporter instead of horses, and phasers instead of think, extra stars free slot machine recommend />Ah, as I read down, I see others have come to similar points.
I think you are going way too far here.
Just because Star Trek doesn't delve deep into economics and science and posits huge cultural changes doesn't mean what its doing isn't science fiction.
Its merely a lighter, more watchable, more popular sort of sci-fi than a "hard science fiction" novel.
Its not like hard sci-fi is going to get things anywhere close to right or deal with all the implications either.
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar Actually I asked two questions: The second one was "Must everything that remains scarce be commoditized and traded based on a single medium of exchange?
I argue you can see 1 and 2 even in pockets of a lot of contemporary society.
Many people choose jobs and careers for self-fulfillment reasons, not pure money.
Many people with wealth don't want the biggest houses, the rarest art, and so on.
There's a ton of people who acquire a lot of wealth, live fairly modestly, and give a lot away to universities, charities, and relatives I've handled enough of the paperwork to know that's fairly common.
I guess those who spend big tend to make a big scene and makes people think its more common than it is.
Is it contradictory or is there a ideology that they are enlightened and post-scarcity?
Anyway, my positions is that the important point is that there is simply a lot of people in the Federation aren't that concerned about money and stuff.
That's just the way the article source was built.
I think you are going way too far here.
Just because Star Trek doesn't delve deep into economics and science and posits huge cultural changes doesn't mean what its doing isn't science fiction.
Its merely a lighter, more watchable, more star wars slot bonus sort of sci-fi than a "hard science fiction" novel.
Its not like hard sci-fi is going to get things anywhere close to right or deal with for starbucks for codes stars the implications either.
Being 'unconcerned' with money and focused on self-fulfillment doesn't magically invalidate the fact that currency exists because it makes any kind of material transactions MASSIVELY more convenient for all parties involved.
Not using a currency means that any kind of transaction is significantly more complicated, and potentially impossible in a large number of cases.
The fact that acquiring money isn't a primary concern does not remove the utility of currency for a society.
Transcending greed and acquisition of material wealth as a driving force for a society is perfectly reasonable.
Eliminating currency completely is utterly idiotic and completely counter-productive.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
I already conceded that point a little bit above.
Money is a highly useful concept for satisfying systems of demand, fine enough.
It's useful enough that where real money doesn't do the job or is impractical, large organizations sometimes create their own fake money.
Credit systems are used in place of cash sometimes for large organization transactions.
To crib from another poster "it's a matter of logistics.
The bright and rosy future of a post-utopian post-scarcity society is envisionable all the way until the plot demands some pocket of evil develop internally.
Hey, you can be a sci-fi, and post-scarcity socialist-utopian, AND still be a popular tv drama.
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar I already conceded that point a little bit above.
Money is a highly useful concept for satisfying systems of demand, fine enough.
It's useful enough that where real money doesn't do the job or is impractical, large organizations sometimes create their own fake money.
Credit systems are used in place of cash sometimes for large organization transactions.
To crib from another poster "it's a matter of logistics.
The bright and rosy future of a post-utopian post-scarcity society is envisionable all the way until the plot demands some pocket of evil develop internally.
Hey, you can be a sci-fi, and post-scarcity socialist-utopian, AND still be a popular tv drama.
The point is that the party line is that the Federation doesn't use money, and that representatives of Starfleet express disdain and disbelief at the undeveloped rubes that still use it.
Both Picard and Kirk outright stated that money DID NOT EXIST anymore, and Nog stated that the Federation had here currency based economics.
The whole idea of no money is based on Roddenberry's poorly thought out concept that money only exists because of greed, and if we weren't greedy we wouldn't need money.
Which is just ridiculous.
Money is simply one focal point for greed, not the cause of it, and it is a focal point for greed because of currency's inherent utility in a society.
Money is, by itself, completely useless, the only thing it is useful for is exchanging it for actual items of use.
In short, the idea of a no money society is patently ridiculous, but stated unambiguously by multiple characters, and yet at every turn the show is quietly forced to admit in the background that it's a https://free-slots-money.website/star/star-trek-slots-wms.html idea that isn't actually possible.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
The point is that the party line is that the Federation doesn't use money, and that representatives of Starfleet express disdain and disbelief at the undeveloped rubes that still use it.
Both Picard and Kirk outright stated that money DID NOT EXIST anymore, and Nog stated that the Federation had abandoned currency based economics.
In TOS, there were numerous references to money, at least in the figurative sense.
Now, if I were to justify the idea rather than just dismiss it as a silly imposition from Roddenberry, I'd say that the Federation doesn't use money per se, but rather deals in the codes for google play music of energy itself instead and has not yet grown to the limits of its technology and hence is a "post-scarcity" society, at least within its member worlds and on its starships.
As such, barring an emergency, the Federation is capable of producing all of the needs of all of its citizens without worrying about economic transactions, and so as a society they only need to consider money when dealing with external parties like the Ferengi.
There is a point made during a TNG episode that replicated food isnt even "the original stuff, but recreated".
This indicates that all replicated food is merely rearranged premade stuff with flavor and texture added.
A replicated carrot will be fake, not the actual copy of a carrot.
And all of these foods will ALWAYS be good for your health.
Little wonder Pa Sisko prefers the real stuff.
While I was looking things up on this I'm inclined to believe there's at least one "replicated food isn't as good as the real thing" discussion that someone says, "but it's molecularly identical!
Which actually makes me more inclined to buy in to the mass mind control fanon.
Blue Eyes Black Lotus!
Does it like, summon a.
What would that card even do!?
Completely unviable in actual play, so don't worry about it.
I'm thinking at this point we are just making two very different points that are not necessarily incompatible with each other.
If Star Trek admits it uses money, and I admit it uses money, then all that's left is whether I'll engage the notion of whether "a no money society" is ridiculous I've said my piece, money could be used in limited ways without being all-pervasiveor you will engage the notion that a Star Trek society, of the sort that was actually displayed and that I spoke about rather than something that might have been in Gene's head briefly is plausible.
It would have been awesome if the writers had put as much thought into it as you guys do.
The laws of physics are not crying in a corner, they are bawling in the forums.
Thanks to for the avatar Being 'unconcerned' with money and focused on self-fulfillment doesn't magically invalidate the fact that currency exists because it makes any kind of material transactions MASSIVELY more convenient for all parties involved.
Not using a currency means that any kind of transaction is significantly more complicated, and potentially impossible in a large number of cases.
What material transactions does the average Federation citizen make?
Food's free, clothing's free, housing's free, medical treatment's free, entertainment's free, art supplies are free, work supplies are free; what else is there?
Your average citizen isn't going to be buying a starship, no matter how much money they have.
What's with the brianwashing talk?
The Federation always depicted is a paragon for a government built on morality and recognition of human rights.
It is a very point of view sort of thing.
If someone thinks money is bad, and you agree with that, you will think that it is good they think that way.
You might even go as far to think that the single way they think is ''obviously right'', just as you agree with it.
But it only works if you agree.
However, for the most part, the role of non-Utopian realists, anarchists, and other types that disagree with the way the Federation does things, comes from aliens and the occasional human-looking people who never joined the Federation.
Well, of course Federation people are barinwashed not to rebel.
And really, for all the hype, Star Trek is full of disagreements.
The disagreement about the Prime Directive fills tons of episodes, for example.
And there are a lot of episodes where ''crewperson X disagrees with the orders''.
The word you're looking for is "socialized," and every society does it.
No need to invoke operant conditioning or torture.
It might be ''socializing'' if you agree with it, but it is ''brainwashing'' if you don't.
The DS9 barter episode is more of a one-off light-hearted episode than a suggestion for how the economy of the future works.
Note it is not the ''one DS9 barter episode'', it comes up a lot during the show.
You want a super serious heavy hearted example: Sisko must batter with the alien to get a Cardassian Data Rod so that he can trick the Romulanins into joining the war, by giving that alien ''bio gel''.
And even the other alien gets a barter with ''I''l get you out of jail, if you do a job for me.
Food's free, clothing's free, housing's free, medical treatment's free, entertainment's free, art supplies are free, work supplies are free; what else is there?
Your average citizen isn't going to be buying a starship, no matter how much money they have.
Literally anything that does not come out of a replicator - many, MANY things are level bonus lego wars star not replicable or explicitly more desirable when natural food and drink in particular.
So various amounts, depending on the citizen.
And regardless of the frequency, it is simple fact that a currency based transaction is the most efficient manner of getting anything you don't see more />Live off the replicator and don't want anything else?
No need for you to ever touch money.
But for a SOCIETY to claim they have no money is simply ridiculous, especially when at every turn people admit that yeah they actually do use money.
How exactly do you think Sisko Sr ensures a steady supply of all of the necessary foodstuffs to run his restaurant?
How would somebody with the dream of opening a restaurant get the rights to the land in an appropriate location to set up a restaurant?
Housing being 'free' simply ignores the fact that location of housing is a significant factor for many people and is not something that can ever be re-created.
There simply is not enough space on the southern California coast for everybody who wants one to live in a house there.
Not everybody can live in a house with a view of the Eiffel Tower.
Not everybody can live in a cabin in the wilderness.
So claiming that housing is 'free' completely ignores the fact that even if every house were an exact replica, the location would make them more or less desirable to people.
So how exactly do you think people get housing in desirable this web page />And starships aren't actually that rare.
Sure a normal citizen isn't going to buy a ship the size of the Enterprise.
But there are MANY small shuttles and transports that are not particularly hard to imagine a normal person who dedicates a reasonable amount of dedication towards the goal of owning a starship to be able to buy something the size of Quark's shuttle.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
While I was looking things up on this I'm inclined to believe there's at least one "replicated food isn't as good as the real thing" discussion that someone says, "but it's molecularly identical!
Which actually makes me more inclined to buy in to the mass mind control fanon.
Well one major factor in a replicator would be that you get an exactly identical item out of the replicator every time you use that pattern.
Want a glass of wine out of the replicator?
It's going to taste exactly the same every time.
It's cooked and seasoned exactly the same every time.
You're getting the exact same mix every time.
Want a glass of hot tea?
It comes out exactly the same mix and exactly the same temperature every time and if you asked for a glass of water and a teabag you're getting the exact same teabag every time.
A lot of what people enjoy about food is that the same meal can be prepared many different ways and yield different tastes.
A medium rare ribeye steak cooked by one chef may taste completely different from one prepared by another.
Even with the same chef it's going to have variance in it due to differences in ingredients, temperatures, cook times, etc.
Even if prepared in exactly the same way a steak from a corn-fed cow from Iowa is going to taste different from a grass fed cow from Texas.
But a replicator you are getting everything the same every time, down to the molecule.
That would get really boring really fast.
Even if you have different patterns for the same meal you still get that exact variation every time.
Then of course there is the next factor that apparently patterns have been tweaked to be healthier.
So if you enjoy a steak with a lot of fat you're just out of luck getting it from a replicator.
ALL HAIL THE GREAT RAK!!
I use the same name in every game I ever play or forum I join except the pretender on PSN that forced me to be RealOlinser.
If you see an Olinser in a game or on a website, there's a high chance it's me, feel free to shoot me a message.
Literally anything that does not come out of a replicator - many, MANY things are either not replicable or explicitly more desirable when natural food and drink in particular.
So various amounts, depending on the citizen.
And regardless of the frequency, it is simple fact that a currency based transaction is the most efficient manner of getting anything you don't have.
Live off the replicator and don't want anything else?
No need for you to ever touch money.
But for a SOCIETY to claim they have no money is simply ridiculous, especially when at every turn people admit that yeah they actually do use money.
How exactly do you think Sisko Sr ensures a steady supply of all of the necessary foodstuffs to run his restaurant?
How would somebody with the dream of opening a restaurant get the rights to the land in an appropriate location to set up a restaurant?
Housing being 'free' simply ignores the fact that location of housing is a significant factor for many people and is not something that can ever be re-created.
There simply is not enough space on the southern California coast for everybody who wants one to live in a house there.
Not everybody can live in a house with a view of the Eiffel Tower.
Not everybody can live in a cabin in the wilderness.
So claiming that housing is 'free' completely ignores the fact that even if every house were an exact replica, the location would make them more or less desirable to people.
So how exactly do you think people get housing in desirable locations?
And starships aren't actually that rare.
Sure a normal citizen isn't going to buy a ship the size of the Enterprise.
But there are MANY small shuttles and transports that are not particularly hard to imagine a normal person who dedicates a reasonable amount of dedication towards the goal of owning a starship to be able to buy something the size of Quark's shuttle.
I agree that scarcity probably still exists in the Federation, even though the vast majority of what someone needs to live are provided for free within the Federation, and that currencies and markets are the most efficient method of allocating those resources.
However, it doesn't mean that the Federation needs to have money, but instead that the Federation has to have some kind of system in place to allocate those resources and ensure that society continues progressing and the necessary work continues to be done.
In the real world, there are a few places that we consider it abhorrent to charge money or have a currency-based system; organ donation and organ transplant is one.
We simply don't have enough information to know how the Federation economy works, mostly because the series follows military members who live on a ship or outside the Federation and rarely does anyone meet a normal citizen of the Federation.
We don't know what the average citizen does for work or even if they have to work.
We don't know how housing is determined.
It could be done via a voucher or a point system or it could be centrally planned or if the citizen just lives in their mom's basement until they join Starfleet or a colony.
For all its travel to the final frontier, Star Trek doesn't spend much time on home.
Literally anything that does not come out of a replicator - many, MANY things are either not replicable or explicitly more desirable when natural food and drink in particular.
So go to a restaurant, where the chef will prepare a meal and give it to you for free, for the simple joy of preparing and serving food.
How exactly do you think Sisko Sr ensures a steady supply of all of the necessary foodstuffs to run his restaurant?
How would somebody with the dream of opening a restaurant get the rights to the land in an appropriate location to set up a restaurant?
He asks farmers, who are growing food for the simple joy of it, to provide him with ingredients.
In a pinch, he can use replicated ingredients-differences in preparation will prevent the final products from being identical.
For the restaurant, you ask the city planner if you can have a restaurant, and the city planner finds a recently vacated building and turns it into a restaurant for you.
Housing being 'free' simply ignores the fact that location of housing is a significant factor for many people and is https://free-slots-money.website/star/code-poker-star-bonus.html something that can ever be re-created.
There simply is not enough space on the southern California coast for everybody who wants one to live in a house there.
Not everybody can live in a house with a view of the Eiffel Tower.
Not everybody can live in a cabin in the wilderness.
So claiming that housing is 'free' completely ignores the fact that even if every house were an exact replica, the location would make them more or less desirable to people.
So how exactly do you think people get housing in desirable locations?
I'm not confident in your assertion that there isn't enough room for people, especially given that beautiful coastline is available throughout the quadrant does it really have to be southern California specifically?
You let the city planner in Paris know what you're looking for, and the first time such a place becomes available, it's yours.
And starships aren't actually that rare.
Sure a normal citizen isn't going to buy a ship the size of the Enterprise.
But there are MANY small shuttles and transports that are not particularly hard to imagine a normal person who dedicates a reasonable amount of dedication towards the goal of owning a starship to be able to buy something the size of Quark's shuttle.
Even shuttles; what percentage of the population do you think want one?
What are they going to do with it?
I'd figure for shuttles it's gonna be a small enough portion of the population that they can be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and handed out to those who have a need for them and withheld from those who don't.
But a replicator you are getting everything the same every time, down to the molecule.
That would get really boring really fast.
I think that's more of a matter of taste.
What the hey, pun intended.
There's probably a fair amount of people who don't care about having their taste buds blown off meal after meal, and having the options of different foods is variant enough to not care about variance within the same food.
Maybe I'm just not good enough at tasting things, but it sounds er, pun intended, again like the old analog music is richer than digital music discussion: sure, whatever floats your boat, but I'll stick with the inferior product with which I don't see the problem.
And really, if the quality is that noticeable, you'd think they'd be bored about breathing the same air all day everyday.
Blue Eyes Black Lotus!
Does it like, summon a.
What would that card even do!?
Completely unviable in actual play, so don't worry about it.
Scott by Amber E.
Scott by Amber E.
Scott by Rich Burlew by Rich Burlew by Rich Burlew Usage of this site, including but not limited to making or editing a post or private message or the creation of an account, constitutes acceptance of the.

T7766547
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

A staple of the Star Trek universe is the capacity to beam, or teleport, humans from one location to another. As legend has it, Gene Roddenberry came up with the idea as a work-around to filming.


Enjoy!
Currency - Official Star Trek Online Wiki
Valid for casinos
Money | Memory Alpha | FANDOM powered by Wikia
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
Space Guns Don't Work (But We Built One Anyway)